“I trust what you have said that you will read this . . . .”

Notice how Mr. Rogers starts: “I trust what you have said that you will read this . . . .” Doing this, he accomplishes two things:

  1. Gently burdens Senator John Pastore to read his statement by overtly placing his trust in him to do so.
  2. Extends his argument. By choosing not to read his statement, offering it for consideration after the hearing, he creates another opportunity for his argument to be heard.

I also love the way he ends his argument:

What do you do with the mad that you feel
When you feel so mad you could bite?
When the whole wide world seems oh, so wrong…
And nothing you do seems very right?

What do you do? Do you punch a bag?
Do you pound some clay or some dough?
Do you round up friends for a game of tag?
Or see how fast you go?

It’s great to be able to stop
When you’ve planned a thing that’s wrong,
And be able to do something else instead
And think this song:

I can stop when I want to
Can stop when I wish
I can stop, stop, stop any time.
And what a good feeling to feel like this
And know that the feeling is really mine.
Know that there’s something deep inside
That helps us become what we can.
For a girl can be someday a woman
And a boy can be someday a man.

The song makes the importance of Mr. Rogers’s work real. And it works.